Exhibitions
 

On View

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En la Cocina with San Pascual

Friday, September 27, 2013 thru June 2014

Tuesday-Sunday 10am - 5pm

Art Museum

$3 Adults, $2 seniors, free for children 16 & under. Free on Sundays.

San Pascual (or spelled Pasqual or Pasquale) is the beloved "saint of the kitchen" featured in numerous representations in New Mexican and Mexican art.  Throughout the last half the twentieth century, cooks have decorated their kitchens with his image to insure that recipes come out sabrosas (tasty) and perfectas (perfect). Even Julia Child had one in her kitchen!  Café Pasqual's, a trend-setting restaurant in Santa Fe, is named for him.  

Where did San Pascual come from? What did he do before he became a cook? How did he become so popular in New Mexican art?  Who appointed him the goodwill ambassador of kitchens? Why do Nuevo Mexicano artists have so much fun depicting this saint, and rendering the architecture, interiors, kitchen appliances, cooking utensils, and food (not to mention the wine!)?  The exhibition, En la Cocina with San Pascual, in the NHCC Art Museum's Community Gallery explores his image and highlights how artists creatively render this popular santo. The exhibition features over 75 works by some of New Mexico's most prominent visual artists.

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"Getting Up Pa'l Pueblo" Poetry Jam: Tagging It Out Loud

Thursday, April 24, 2014

6:30 pm

Art Museum

Free public event

The NHCC is hosting a spoken word night in conjunction with our current exhibition Getting Up Pa 'l Pueblo: Tagging ASAR-Oaxaca Prints and Stencils, which features block prints and stencils from the University of New Mexico's ASARO (Assembly of Revolutionary Artists of Oaxaca) collection. "Getting up" is slang for posting and applying images in public places; generally, the expression refers to street art. ASARO is a contemporary Mexican artists' collective working in block prints, stencils, and graffiti murals. The group was formed in 2006 after riot police repressed annual teachers' demonstrations in the state capital of Oaxaca.

The poetry jam promises to be a wonderful complement to the exhibition and a thrilling evening of art, poetry, pueblo, and history-everyone is welcome to take the floor and share their voices. For more information, please call 505-246-2261.

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Getting Up Pa'l Pueblo: Tagging ASAR-Oaxaca Prints and Stencils

Friday, February 28-Saturday, November 9, 2014; Tuesday-Sunday 10 am-5 pm           

Art Museum

$3 Adults, $2 seniors, free for children 16 & under. Free admission to reception and on Sundays; otherwise by museum admission

Getting Up Pa 'l Pueblo: Tagging ASAR-Oaxaca Prints and Stencils features block prints and stencils from the ASARO (Assembly of Revolutionary Artists of Oaxaca) collection in the University of New Mexico's College of University Libraries and Learning Science, Zimmerman Library, Center for Southwest Research and Special Collections (CSWR). "Getting up" is slang for posting and applying images in public places; generally, the expression refers to street art. ASARO is a contemporary Mexican artists' collective working in block prints, stencils, and graffiti murals. The group was formed in 2006 after riot police repressed annual teachers' demonstrations in the state capital of Oaxaca.

In a localized adaptation of ASARO's commitment to visual and verbal exchange, museum visitors can participate by physically "tagging" the art works as they view them or virtually labeling them on the exhibit webpage asaro.unm.edu/exhibit. These labels will be collected and digitized, eventually becoming a permanent part of the CSWR collection at UNM.

Getting Up Pa'l Pueblo is curated by Dr. Suzanne M. Schadl, Latin American Collections Curator, College of University Libraries and Learning Science, UNM and Mike Graham de la Rosa, Curatorial Intern, NHCC and Master's candidate in Latin American Studies, UNM, and is dedicated to the memory of UNM Distinguished Professor of Art History David Craven (1951-2012).

The exhibition was partially funded by a grant from the New Mexico Humanities Council, as well as through the National Hispanic Cultural Center. Additional sponsors include the Latin American and Iberian Institute, Center for Regional Studies, Southwest Hispanic Research Institute, and College of Fine Arts at UNM.